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British Television At Its Best

The BBC has always had quality programming. Shows that the U.S. has had the pleasure of copying. The most famous shows include The Office, Antiques Roadshow, Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and Pop Idol becoming American Idol. It seems that almost all British television shows can translate into the American market. Almost all of them.

One show should only be viewed in its original form: Top Gear.

With hosts Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May, Top Gear is a motoring magazine show, mostly about cars, where segments of the show are broken up with interviews with celebrities. The show started its most recent run beginning in 2002, and is still producing new episodes.

The segments include challenges in which the hosts must partake. If the show takes them on a “road trip” themed episode, the challenges will include how well their cars will do in that particular country in an effort to race to the finish. There have been many races on the show, including a trip through Vietnam as well as the United States.

Many of the shows have the hosts reviewing new cars. This is a big part of what the show is about, but perhaps the most famous segment the show has conceived is putting a “Star in a Reasonably Priced Car.” A celebrity will talk to the hosts about whatever thing they’re plugging, then do a lap on the “Top Gear Test Track” in an inexpensive automobile. The show originally put the stars in a Suzuki Liana, but have recently been using a Chevrolet Lacetti, and most recently a Kia model.

The show has been attempted to be made in America with new American hosts, but all attempts have failed to gain any viewership. The show just isn’t the same without the original hosts, which makes sense. I mean, you wouldn’t want to watch Monty Python’s Flying Circus with a bunch of guys from Texas.

Or maybe you would.

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About Alex

I am a student at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, OK. I am an advertising major and love advertising, because it is everywhere.

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